Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Poetic Forms : HAIKU (Week 4, A Repost)

Welcome to the 4th installment of our FEATURE "POETIC FORMS", to get inspired and know the world of different forms of poetry and I am Shashi your host. Every month on the 3rd Wednesday, I will try to give you info about some forms of poetry which has attracted me and inspired me..
This post will also have some interesting example's to inspire you to write some poetry in the form.... so here we go friends with one of the most interesting forms that has kept me captivated for decades

....
HAIKU .... 

One of the most interesting form of Poetry from Japan, which is all about creating an image within the reader's mind with very few words...

Wish this post inspires you to paint some beautiful images within 17 syllables and in 3 lines.

Go on... read and then post some of your own trial runs, rough drafts or your polished gems of HAIKU. I look forward to reading them and come back to you with my suggestions and my thoughts...


How to Submit My Poetry?

Add your entry via InLinkz below by clicking on the blue button, and leave a comment in case it is your first time! It would be great if you could link back to us on your blog.


Now without any further delay... here is this month's POETIC FORM "HAIKU" for you to sink your creative teeth in and let your words flow....


Classic Haiku

Haiku are short, brilliantly vivid poems containing visually complete descriptions of moments in a poet’s experience. In the space of their original 17 Japanese syllables, haiku express worlds of profound emotion and philosophical insight. Simple on the surface, yet fascinatingly complex on close study, Haiku have universal appeal and the number of languages into which they have been translated testify to this.

Much, though not all, early Japanese poetry was written by nobility, and despite the strict conventions of behaviors imposed on courtiers of the 8thto the 11th centuries, much of their poetry still radiates inspiration and sparkle today.

Nature images, such as cherry blossom, in early Japanese poetry became one of the most characteristic features of the canon. In other poems such as this by the 8th centaury poet Takechi no Kurohito, a note of melancholy suffuses the poet’s vivid perception, and the snapshot of natural beauty is modulated by the suggestion of human activity, a technique often used by Haiku poets many centuries later.

Travelling and lonely, I see beneath a hill
A boat painted with red clay rowing to the other side.
- Kurohito

Murasaki Shikibu, illustration
by
 Tosa Mitsuoki (17th century)
Writers of the medieval period in Japan, from roughly the 8th to the 13th centuries, produced an enormous literature of love poetry. Most of the poems in Lady Murasaki’s prose classic “The tale of Genji” were short verses of longing, sadness or reminiscence exchanged between friends of lovers. The following verse traded between Prince Genji and the Japanese Empress at the death-bed of Genji’s wife are characteristic. His poem comes first; hers answers:

In the haste we make to leave this world of dew
May there be no time between the first and last.
- Genji

A world of dew before the autumn winds,
Not only theirs, these fragile leaves of grass
-Empress

Chūnagon Yakamochi by Kanō Tan'yū
The inherent sadness in life’s transient incompleteness is a theme that would preoccupy the great Haiku Poets.

A knowledge of classical poetic tradition represented in the 8th century anthology Man’yoshu and the 10thcentury Kokinshu was indispensable to later poets writing haiku.

The term Waka – a word meaning “Japanese poem” came into use in the 9th century, to minimize the confusion with Chinese Poetry being read and written by educated Japanese people at a time during the T’ang Dynasty when Chinese arts threatened to become overly influential in Japan. It was during this period that Japanese imperial diplomatic and economic ties with Chinawere broken, and consequently Japanese writers were encouraged to pursue more local traditions and genres. Japanese people had been composing Waka for ceremonial occasions long before the advent of a literary culture, and even when writing becomes an established means of discourse, the recitation of Waka remained a public art and means of private communication.

The short form of Waka, later become known as Tanka, which grew to be the most popular poetic vehicle and Haiku developed from it.

The Kokinshu – whose ‘thousands of leaves’ represents the oldest poetic tradition in Japan. It was compiled around 920CE, where the poems are organized according to theme, divided into sections devoted to love and the four seasons. This ordering of topics became prescriptive and for many centuries determined the subjects that were deemed acceptable for study by the professional poets who made a living giving instruction in Haiku writing: the Haiku Masters.

Haiku Rules:
While some Haiku poets claimed a degree of personal freedom, most obeyed decreed compositional rules. First the Haiku consisted of 17 syllables, made of three phrases of five, seven and five syllables. Within this format, the Haiku was generally divided also into two parts standing in contrast or reversal to each other.

A poem might start with a traditional image such as cherry blossom, full moon or dew and then re-focus to a lower perhaps clashing image. A seasonal word (Kigo) was another prescriptive component of Haiku. Other rules underlined the subtler aspects of Haiku. If classical correctness could be ‘lowered’ to let in descriptions of ordinary life, it was, said Basho, important to ‘correct’ the ordinary, imbuing it with poetic exaltation (Fuga). In turn Fuga has to be used to express important ideas: the spiritual wealth within modest and simple things (Wabi); beauty, mystery and elegance (Yugen) as in the example below
 
Stillness and solitude –
Sinking into stones,
The trill of cicadas
- Basho

And melancholy sadness and tranquility (Sabi and Shori)

On a withered branch
A crow has settled.
Nightfall in autumn.
- Basho

Or in the spirit of poetic madness (Fukyo)

Let me show you,
You market people,
This hat filled with snow.
- Basho
 
And sometimes in shockingly comic ‘lightness’ (Karumi)

A bush warbler
Leaves its droppings on the rice cake
At the edge of the verandah.
-Basho

Emphasizing the shift in tone, a cutting word (Kireji) usually sits at the end of one of the phrases. The cutting word was often a semantically meaningless sentence-ending particle such as kana, ka, ya, heri or ran. Such word sounds did not themselves contribute meaning but acted both to divide the poem into two rhythmic halves and to set up a contrast between the two poem’s parts. A seasonal word Kigo was another prescriptive component of Haiku. Early classical literature contained a huge vocabulary of words that implied not only a season but an emotion appropriate to it. Spring, with its mood of optimism, was implied by cherry blossom and certain birds. The bright but often fatiguing summer was often suggested by flower and tree words. Autumn melancholy was expressed by ‘lonely’ images, such as a full moon, wind and dying leaves. Cold words like snow alluded to the hard experience of winter. Poets writing in the spirit of haikai added less refined seasonal words: Dandelion, garlic, horseradish and mating cats all connoted spring for example.

Some of the times, Haiku also shows of an acceptance of the life’s impermanence. The most famous Haiku Master Basho’s haiku some times also demonstrates the genuine Buddhist enlightenment. The following very famous Haiku by the most famous Haiku Master Basho expresses most vividly the truth – the enactment of both, the phenomenon, what is and its passing. In this Haiku, a creature living unconsciously, according to its nature, is shown in the context of the man made artifice of an old garden pond, highlighting the simple bare and eternally ordinary ‘is-ness’ of all existence in the present moment:

Old pond
A frog jumps in,
The sound of water

The Milestones…
After Basho, there have been many great poets who took Haiku to the greater heights …

Buson
The bite of my axe.
Sudden revelation –
There is life in this tree!

As Buson accepts his death quietly in this farewell poem

White plum blossoms,
Night turns to dawn –
The time has come



Kobayashi Issa
Alone among the shady bushes
A girl is singing
A rice planter's song

Masaoka Shiki
A river in summer
There’s a bridge here, but
My horse prefers water
 
Kaikyo
With useless authority
The great horned owl
Sits moon-eyed in daylight

Etsujin
I envy the tomcat:
How easily he lets go of
Love’s pain and longing

Ranran
The child cries at her breast.
And the mosquito also bites
The sleeping mother

Senna
With ink-stained lips,
The boy leaves his poem
For the cool outdoors

______________
For further reading and my personal journey in knowing and embracing Haiku, please check out my blog feature @ Haiku – The essence of a poetic moment

Now Join in with Linkz below to share, to read some great talents and get inspired...
________________
 नमः शिवाय
Om Namah Shivaya
Text and Image Sources: Tom Lowenstein’s Classic Haiku and Wikipedia


Greetings from The Purple Treehouse, 

We redo Shashi's Haiku Form so that you can submit  

Haiku

to our site, in celebrating Christmas and New Year of 2011-2012, Have Fun! 

Friday, December 2, 2011

Funny Bunny Fridays Week 5 (December 2-11, 2011)




Hello, Welcome to The Purple Treehouse!


Beginning August, we have had a monthly prompt called Funny Bunny Fridays, which posts monthly on the first Friday, 1pm, American Central...The linkz will be up at the same time, and remain open for 9 full days  until the second Sunday, 8pm!


This is our Fifth one, and this prompt is open to everything or anything funny in life! 


Possible Types of Funnies (It could be your own creation or by someone else!)


#1: Jokes
#2: Poetry, including free verses, Haiku, couplets, limericks, or Haiku...
#3: Quotes
#4: Cartoons
#5: Short Stories
#6: Art/Paintings/Drawings
#7: Videos or movie clips
#8: Music or Songs
#9: Photo Shots/Images on people, animals, signs, slogans, events, and etc.


Basic Instructions:

#1: post anything funny in your own blog.
#2: tag The Purple Treehouse or Funny Bunny Fridays post.
#3: share your entry with  your peers by linking your entry to our collection via inlinkz below.
#4: click on names of your peers to read, laugh, and think...



Image Credit: Google.com

Friday, November 4, 2011

Funny Bunny Fridays Week 4 (November 4-13, 2011)




Hello, Welcome to The Purple Treehouse!


Beginning August, we have had a monthly prompt called Funny Bunny Fridays, which posts monthly on the first Friday, 1pm, American Central...The linkz will be up at the same time, and remain open for 9 full days  until the second Sunday, 8pm!


This is our Fourth one, and this prompt is open to everything or anything funny in life! 


Possible Types of Funnies (It could be your own creation or by someone else!)


#1: Jokes
#2: Poetry, including free verses, Haiku, couplets, limericks, or Haiku...
#3: Quotes
#4: Cartoons
#5: Short Stories
#6: Art/Paintings/Drawings
#7: Videos or movie clips
#8: Music or Songs
#9: Photo Shots/Images on people, animals, signs, slogans, events, and etc.


Basic Instructions:


#1: post anything funny in your own blog.
#2: tag The Purple Treehouse or Funny Bunny Fridays post.
#3: share your entry with  your peers by linking your entry to our collection via inlinkz below.
#4: click on names of your peers to read, laugh, and think...


Friday, October 7, 2011

Funny bunny Fridays Week 3 (October 7-16)




Hello, Welcome to The Purple Treehouse!


Beginning August, we have had a monthly prompt called Funny Bunny Fridays, which posts monthly on the first Friday, 1pm, American Central...The linkz will be up at the same time, and remain open for 9 full days  until the second Sunday, 8pm!


This is our third one, and this prompt is open to everything or anything funny in life! 


Possible Types of Funnies (It could be your own creation or by someone else!)


#1: Jokes
#2: Poetry, including free verses, Haiku, couplets, limericks, or Haiku...
#3: Quotes
#4: Cartoons
#5: Short Stories
#6: Art/Paintings/Drawings
#7: Videos or movie clips
#8: Music or Songs
#9: Photo Shots/Images on people, animals, signs, slogans, events, and etc.


Basic Instructions:


#1: post anything funny in your own blog.
#2: tag The Purple Treehouse or Funny Bunny Fridays post.
#3: share your entry with  your peers by linking your entry to our collection via inlinkz below.
#4: click on names of your peers to read, laugh, and think...




Let's spend some time laughing at ourselves or giggling at creations that are tickling from our blogging friends here, isn't it a fabulous way to relax, and start a month with lots of positive energy and inspirations?

Image Credit: Google.com on Humor or Funny Images

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

POETIC FORMS WK 3 : LIMERICK (Sept. 21-October 2, 2011)


Poetic Forms: Limerick

Edward Lear's book that made Limericks popular world wide
in year 1845
Welcome to the 3rd Instalment of our FEATURE "POETIC FORMS", to get inspired and know the world of different forms of poetry and I am Shashi your host. Every month on the 3rd Wednesday, I will try to give you info about some forms of poetry which has attracted me and inspired me... over the years. .....

This post will also have some interesting example's to inspire you to write some poetry in the same form.... so here we are with another, though ancient Form, has lot of modern following… Hope this post interests you to write LIMERICKS… and enjoy with whole of your group as sometimes it can be very very interesting..

How to Submit Your Poetry?

Add your entry via InLinkz below by clicking on the blue button, and leave a comment in case it is your first time! It would be great if you could link back to us on your blog.

Monthly Poetic Form starts on 3rd Wednesday every month, 1:30pm (CDT), and will stay open till next Sunday, 8pm (CDT), At least 11 days for you to share your efforts in writing or trying a new poetry form and share with us...

Now without any further delay... here is this month's POETIC FORM "LIMERICK" for you to think interestingly as well as to keep in mind that Limericks are kind of witty, humorous as well as they some times are obscene with humorous intent...


ORIGIN OF THE NAME

The origin of the name limerick for this type of poem is debated. As of several years ago, its usage was first documented in England in 1898 (New English Dictionary) and in America in 1902, but in recent years several earlier uses have been documented. The name is generally taken to be a reference to the City or County of Limerick in Ireland, sometimes particularly to the Maigue Poets, and may derive from an earlier form of nonsense verse parlour game that traditionally included a refrain that included "Will [or won't] you come (up) to Limerick?" The earliest known use of the name "Limerick" for this type poem is an 1880 reference, in a Saint John, New Brunswick newspaper, to an apparently well-known tune,

[Pie]: There was a young rustic named Mallory,
who drew but a very small salary.
    When he went to the show,
    his purse made him go
to a seat in the uppermost gallery.
Tune: Wont you come to Limerick.

What actually is a Limerick

A limerick is a kind of a witty, humorous, or nonsense poem, especially one in five-line anapestic or amphibrachic meter with a strict rhyme scheme (aabba), which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The form can be found in England as of the early years of the 18th century. It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century, although he did not use the term.

The following example of a limerick is of unknown origin.

The limerick* packs laughs anatomical                   *(pronounced "lim'rick" to preserve meter)
In space that is quite economical,
    But the good ones I've seen
    So seldom are clean,
And the clean ones so seldom are comical.

Gershon Legman, who compiled the largest and most scholarly anthology, held that the true limerick as a folk form is always obscene, and cites similar opinions by Arnold Bennett and George Bernard Shaw, describing the clean limerick as a periodic fad and object of magazine contests, rarely rising above mediocrity. From a folkloric point of view, the form is essentially transgressive; violation of taboo is part of its function.

THE TECHNICALITIES

The standard form of a limerick is a stanza of five lines, with the first, second and fifth usually rhyming with one another and having three feet of three syllables each; and the shorter third and fourth lines also rhyming with each other, but having only two feet of three syllables. The defining "foot" of a limerick's meter is usually the anapaest, (ta-ta-TUM), but limericks can also be considered amphibrachic(ta-TUM-ta).

However, from a rhythmic point of view, lines 1, 2 and 5 have a silent accent at the end, making 4 accents per line. Lines 3 and 4 combined also have 4 accents, making four lines with an overall total of 16 accents (i.e. foot tapping "beats" ). This is why limericks can be sung to sixteen bars of 3/4 music. Reading, or reciting, naturally follows the faster rhythm of 6/8 time, making eight bars of two triplets per bar. A triplet represents a "foot" of 3 syllables.

The first line traditionally introduces a person and a place, with the place appearing at the end of the first line and establishing the rhyme scheme for the second and fifth lines. In early limericks, the last line was often essentially a repeat of the first line, although this is no longer customary.

Within the genre, ordinary speech stress is often distorted in the first line, and may be regarded as a feature of the form: "There was a young man from the coast;" "There once was a girl from Detroit…" Legman takes this as a convention whereby prosody is violated simultaneously with propriety. Exploitation of geographical names, especially exotic ones, is also common, and has been seen as invoking memories of geography lessons in order to subvert the decorum taught in the schoolroom; Legman finds that the exchange of limericks is almost exclusive to comparatively well-educated males, women figuring in limericks almost exclusively as "villains or victims". The most prized limericks incorporate a kind of twist, which may be revealed in the final line or lie in the way the rhymes are often intentionally tortured, or both. Many limericks show some form of internal rhymealliteration or assonance, or some element of word play

Verses in limerick form are sometimes combined with a refrain to form a limerick song, a traditional humorous drinking song often with obscene verses.

Now lets give you some more examples...

EDWARD LEAR

Edward Lear
The limerick form was popularized by Edward Lear in his first Book of Nonsense (1845) and a later work (1872) on the same theme. Lear wrote 212 limericks, mostly nonsense verse. It was customary at the time for limericks to accompany an absurd illustration of the same subject, and for the final line of the limerick to be a kind of conclusion, usually a variant of the first line ending in the same word.

There was a Young Person of Smyrna
Whose grandmother threatened to burn her*;
But she seized on the cat,
and said 'Granny, burn that!
You incongruous old woman of Smyrna!'
*(best pronounced " 'er" with non-rhotic accent to preserve rhyme and syllabic stress pattern)

WORLD WAR II
A series of limericks was used to great effect in World War II to obtain priority in a dockyard to have new guns fitted to the Dutch sloop Soemba.

HMS Ark Royal in World War
The first was:
A report has come in from the Soemba
that their salvoes go off like a Rhumba
two guns, they sound fine
but the third five point nine
he am bust and refuse to go boomba.

by Captain Nicholl (Royal Navy)
The series continued up to a final limerick by the vice-chief of staff of the Royal Dutch navy.

____________
Text and Images from Wikipedia

I look forward to read your LIMERICKS ... in weeks to come and this time I am going to make amends for not being commenting... I will make amends and visit all the three weeks together.. with my thoughts in this weekend.... look forward to a lovely weekend.

Cheers!!!!
______
नमः शिवाय 
Om Namah Shivaya



Friday, September 2, 2011

Funny Bunny Fridays Week 2 (Sept. 2-Sept.11, 2011)



Hello, Welcome to The Purple Treehouse Funny Bunny Fridays  Week 2, which posts monthly on the first Friday, 1pm, American Central...The linkz is up at the same time,  and will remain open for 9 full days  until the second Sunday, 8pm!


This prompt is open to everything or anything funny in life! 


Possible Types of Funnies (It could be your own creation or by someone else!)


#1: Jokes
#2: Poetry, including free verses, Haiku, couplets, limericks, or Haiku...
#3: Quotes
#4: Cartoons
#5: Short Stories
#6: Art/Paintings/Drawings
#7: Videos or movie clips
#8: Music or Songs
#9: Photo Shots/Images on people, animals, signs, slogans, events, and etc.


Basic Instructions:


#1: post anything funny in your own blog.
#2: tag The Purple Treehouse or Funny Bunny Fridays post.
#3: share your entry with  your peers by linking your entry to our collection via inlinkz below.
#4: click on names of your peers to read, laugh, and think...



Let's spend some time laughing at ourselves or giggling at creations that are tickling from our blogging friends here, isn't it a fabulous way to relax, and start a month with lots of positive energy and inspirations?








Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Friday, August 5, 2011

Funny Bunny Fridays Week 1



Hello, Welcome to The Purple Treehouse!


Beginning August, we will have a monthly prompt called Funny Bunny Fridays, which will post monthly on the first Friday, 1pm, American Central...The linkz will be up at the same time, and remain open for 9 full days  until the second Sunday, 8pm!


This is our first one, and this prompt is open to everything or anything funny in life! 


Possible Types of Funnies (It could be your own creation or by someone else!)


#1: Jokes
#2: Poetry, including free verses, Haiku, couplets, limericks, or Haiku...
#3: Quotes
#4: Cartoons
#5: Short Stories
#6: Art/Paintings/Drawings
#7: Videos or movie clips
#8: Music or Songs
#9: Photo Shots/Images on people, animals, signs, slogans, events, and etc.


Basic Instructions:


#1: post anything funny in your own blog.
#2: tag The Purple Treehouse or Funny Bunny Fridays post.
#3: share your entry with  your peers by linking your entry to our collection via inlinkz below.
#4: click on names of your peers to read, laugh, and think...


Let's spend some time laughing at ourselves or giggling at creations that are tickling from our blogging friends here, isn't it a fabulous way to relax, and start a month with lots of positive energy and inspirations?






Quote: "Those who laugh, Last!"

Thursday, July 21, 2011